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To Iris

Edith Nesbit

If I might build a palace, fair
With every joy of soul and sense,
And set my heart as sentry there
To guard your happy innocence.

If I might plant a hedge so strong
No creeping sorrow could writhe through,
And find my whole life not too long
To give, to make your hedge for you.

If I could teach the wandering air
To bring no sounds that were not sweet,
Could teach the earth that only fair
Untrodden flower deserved your feet:

Would I not tear the secret scroll
Where all your griefs lie closely curled,
And give your little hand control
Of all the joys of all the world?

But ah! I have no skill to raise
The palace, teach the hedge to grow;
The common airs blow through your days,
By common ways your dear feet go.

And you must twine of common flowers
The wreath that happy women wear,
And bear in desolate darkened hours
The common griefs that all men bear.

The pinions of my love I fold
Your little shoulders close about:
Ah! could my love keep out the cold
And shut the creeping sorrows out!

Rough paths will tire your darling feet,
Gray skies will weep your tears above,
While round you still, in torment, beat
The impotent wings of mother-love.

Home :: Poetry :: Friendship (5) :: To Iris

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